About the Office

Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusivity

COMING SOON. This page is under construction. Please check back periodically for updates.

What is Title IX?

Title IX

Title IX prohibits discrimination based on sex, gender, sexual orientation, or gender identity, and discrimination based on pregnancy in any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.  The law requires educational institutions to maintain policies, practices and programs that do not discriminate against anyone based on sex.

Title IX Coordinator

Oversees all complaints of sex discrimination and identifying and addressing any patterns or systemic problems that arise during the review of such complaints. The Title IX Coordinator is the central repository of Title IX knowledge on the campus, and is responsible for the design and implementation of education around Title IX for CIAM.

Inquiries regarding the application of Title IX may be directed to the Title IX Coordinator, Claudia Sarabia at claudia.sarabia@ciam.edu or 1(626)350-1500, or the Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights,OCR@ed.gov.

The Title IX Coordinator is available to consult and provide advice to anyone in the CIAM community regarding rights and responsibilities under Title IX as well as policies and procedures. The Title IX office takes complaints of sexual harassment and sexual violence.  The title IX Coordinator ensures that all complaints are handled in accordance with established policies and procedures.

About Title IX

Title IX benefits both females and males, and is at the heart of efforts to create gender equitable schools. The law requires educational institutions to maintain policies, practices and programs that do not discriminate against anyone based on sex.

Title IX States:

“No person in the U.S. shall, on the basis of sex be excluded from participation in, or denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any educational program or activity receiving federal aid.”

Examples of the types of conduct that violate Title IX include, but are not limited to:

  • Pressure for sexual activity
  • Sexual innuendos and comments
  • Sexually explicit questions
  • Requests for sexual favors
  • Unwelcome touching, hugging, stroking, squeezing
  • Spreading rumors about a person’s sexuality
  • Sexual ridicule
  • Displaying or sending sexually suggestive electronic content, including but not limited to emails, text messages, etc.
  • Pervasive displays of pictures, calendars, cartoons, or other materials with sexually explicit or graphic content
  • Stalking a person
  • Attempted or actual sexual violence

CIAM is committed to creating and maintaining a community free of all forms of discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment and pregnancy discrimination. Sexual harassment includes sexual violence.  CIAM does not tolerate sexual harassment, which is prohibited both by law and by CIAM policy.

CIAM students and employees are protected from pregnancy discrimination. Under Title IX, it is illegal for schools to exclude a pregnant student from participating in any part of an educational program.  Other federal and state laws also protect pregnant employees from discrimination. Please click on the links below for resources and information on this topic:

Resources for Pregnant Students, Post Docs, and Faculty

Pregnancy rights under the California Fair Housing & Employment Act

Federal Pregnancy Discrimination Act

Guidance from the Office for Civil Rights (OCR)

Filling a Report

Filing a Report

If you have experienced sexual violence click here for information on reporting options. It is your personal choice to decide to file a complaint or if you decide not to.

You may contact the Title IX Coordinator for consultation, advice, or to file a report if you believe you are experiencing sexual harassment or gender discrimination.

The Title IX Coordinator and the Dean have an obligation to respond to reports of sexual harassment or sexual violence whether the individual making the report requests that no action be taken.

CIAM will make every effort to comply with an individual’s request for confidentiality of reports of sexual harassment or sexual violence in determining an appropriate response; however, the CIAM's legal is obligated to ensure a working and learning environment free from sexual harassment and sexual violence and the for the due process rights of the accused to be informed of the allegations and their source.  To ensure a complete and fair investigation some disclosure will be necessary.

Title IX Office

Claudia Sarabia
claudia.sarabia@ciam.edu
(626) 350-1500 Ext 112

Contact the Title IX Office to file a Title IX complaint.  This office also provides information and consultation about campus policies and procedures regarding sexual harassment to any interested person. Consultations are also available for faculty, supervisors, administrators, and others who need information about their responsibilities to address sexual harassment of which they become aware.

Dean’s Office

Harish Amar
harish.amar@ciam.edu
(626) 350-1500 ext 107

Contact the Dean's Office to file a campus complaint against an offender who is also a CIAM student. The Dean’s Office can also issue a campus stay-away order, which is separate from a court-issued restraining order.

What to Expect

What to Expect

Procedures when a Student is Accused

Students accused of Misconduct and Policy Violations should read the following in conjunction:

CIAM Student Conduct Policy

CIAM Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment Policy

Procedures When a Staff or Faculty Member or Other Academic Appointee Is Accused

Staff or Faculty accused of Misconduct and Policy Violations should read:

Faculty Conduct Policy

CIAM Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment Policy

Employee Conduct Policy

Telling a professor, work colleague, supervisor or friend

You should feel free to talk to a trusted friend or colleague. Keep in mind that managers, supervisors and certain employees such as the Dean are required to report to the Title IX Coordinator.

The chart below shows reporting options and what to expect.

Options Will my information be confidential? Can I request a forensic medical exam? Will there be an investgation? Will there me disciplinary action for the accused?
Title IX Coordinator or Dean Your privacy will be protected to the greatest extent possible. Some UC personnel involved in your case will have access to your information, and your name may be shared with the accused if there's an investigation. Yes. It's up to you. In some cases, physical evidence may assist an investigation. Yes Possibly, depending on the facts of your situation.
Police Report Your name won't be disclosed if you request that it remain confidential.
However, be aware that if the case advances to a court trial, your name would be included in court records, which are public documents.
Yes. It's up to you. In some cases, physical evidence may assist an investigation. Yes Possibly, depending on the facts of your situation.
Anonymous Reporting Yes Yes Depends on the facts of your situation and if it is reported to a campus employee responsible for safety reporting. Depends on the facts of your situation and if it is reported to a campus employee responsible for safety reporting.

Community Resources

For additional information about shelters, legal issues, medical care, and other concerns related to your safety:

National DV Hotline
1-800-799-SAFE (7233) – 24-hour hotline: www.thehotline.org

LA County DV Hotline
1-800-978-3600 – 24-hour hotline

Peace Over Violence
(626) 793-3385 • (310) 392-8381 • (213) 626-3393 – 24-hour hotline
www.peaceoverviolence.org

Sojourn Services for Battered Women and their Children
(310) 264-6644 – 24-hour hotline
http://www.opcc.net/?nd=sojourn

RAINN • (Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network)
1-800-656-HOPE (4673) – 24-hour hotline
www.rainn.org

National Center for Victims of Crime
www.VictimsofCrime.org

LGBTQ Community Resources
www.BreakTheCycle.org
www.lalgbtcenter.org

 

Sexual Harassment Policy

This page is under construction. Please check back periodically for updates.

Definitions

Definitions of Sexual Violence:

Notice to employees and students: certain policy violations may also be a crime under California law. Note the following definitions under California law:

Rape

(which includes acquaintance rape: California Penal Code Section 261.) 

(a) Rape is an act of sexual intercourse accomplished with a person not the spouse of the perpetrator, under any of the following circumstances:

(1) Where a person is incapable, because of a mental disorder or developmental or physical disability, of giving legal consent, and this is known or reasonably should be known to the person committing the act.

(2) Where it is accomplished against a person’s will by means of force, violence, duress, menace, or fear of immediate and unlawful bodily injury on the person or another.

(3) Where a person is prevented from resisting by any intoxicating or anesthetic substance, or any controlled substance, and this condition was known, or reasonably should have been known by the accused.

(4) Where a person is at the time unconscious of the nature of the act, and this is known to the accused. As used in this paragraph,”unconscious of the nature of the act” means incapable of resisting because the victim meets any one of the following conditions:

(A) Was unconscious or asleep.

(B) Was not aware, knowing, perceiving, or cognizant that the act occurred.

(C) Was not aware, knowing, perceiving, or cognizant of the essential characteristics of the act due to the perpetrator’s fraud in fact.

(D) Was not aware, knowing, perceiving, or cognizant of the essential characteristics of the act due to the perpetrator’s fraudulent representation that the sexual penetration served a professional purpose when it served no professional purpose.

(5) Where a person submits under the belief that the person committing the act is someone known to the victim other than the accused, and this belief is induced by any artifice, pretense, or concealment practiced by the accused, with intent to induce the belief.

(6) Where the act is accomplished against the victim’s will by threatening to retaliate in the future against the victim or any other person, and there is a reasonable possibility that the perpetrator will execute the threat. As used in this paragraph, “threatening to retaliate” means a threat to kidnap or falsely imprison, or to inflict extreme pain, serious bodily injury, or death.

(b) As used in this section, “duress” means a direct or implied threat of force, violence, danger, or retribution sufficient to coerce a reasonable person of ordinary susceptibilities to perform an act which otherwise would not have been performed, or acquiesce in an act to which one otherwise would not have submitted. The total circumstances, including the age of the victim, and his or her relationship to the defendant, are factors to consider in appraising the existence of duress.

(c) As used in this section, “menace” means any threat, declaration, or act which shows an intention to inflict an injury upon another.

Domestic or Dating Violence 

California Penal Code Section 13700. 

(a) “Abuse” means intentionally or recklessly causing or attempting to cause bodily injury, or placing another person in reasonable apprehension of imminent serious bodily injury to himself or herself, or another.

(b) “Domestic violence” means abuse committed against an adult or a minor who is a spouse, former spouse, cohabitant, former cohabitant, or person with whom the suspect has had a child or is having or has had a dating or engagement relationship. For purposes of this subdivision, “cohabitant” means two unrelated adult persons living together for a substantial period of time, resulting in some permanency of relationship. Factors that may determine whether persons are cohabiting include, but are not limited to, (1) sexual relations between the parties while sharing the same living quarters, (2) sharing of income or expenses, (3) joint use or ownership of property, (4) whether the parties hold themselves out as husband and wife, (5) the continuity of the relationship, and (6) the length of the relationship.

Sexual Assault 

California Penal Code Section 243.4: 

(c) Any person who touches an intimate part of another person for the purpose of sexual arousal, sexual gratification, or sexual abuse, and the victim is at the time unconscious of the nature of the act because the perpetrator fraudulently represented that the touching served a professional purpose, is guilty of sexual battery. A violation of this subdivision is punishable by imprisonment in a county jail for not more than one year, and by a fine not exceeding two thousand dollars ($2,000); or by imprisonment in the state prison for two, three, or four years, and by a fine not exceeding ten thousand dollars ($10,000).

(d) Any person who, for the purpose of sexual arousal, sexual gratification, or sexual abuse, causes another, against that person’s will while that person is unlawfully restrained either by the accused or an accomplice, or is institutionalized for medical treatment and is seriously disabled or medically incapacitated, to masturbate or touch an intimate part of either of those persons or a third person, is guilty of sexual battery. A violation of this subdivision is punishable by imprisonment in a county jail for not more than one year, and by a fine not exceeding two thousand dollars ($2,000); or by imprisonment in the state prison for two, three, or four years, and by a fine not exceeding ten thousand dollars ($10,000).

(e) (1) Any person who touches an intimate part of another person, if the touching is against the will of the

person touched, and is for the specific purpose of sexual arousal, sexual gratification, or sexual abuse, is guilty of misdemeanor sexual battery, punishable by a fine not exceeding two thousand dollars ($2,000), or by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding six months, or by both that fine and imprisonment. However, if the defendant was an employer and the victim was an employee of the defendant, the misdemeanor sexual battery shall be punishable by a fine not exceeding three thousand dollars ($3,000), by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding six months, or by both that fine and imprisonment. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, any amount of a fine above two thousand dollars ($2,000) which is collected from a defendant for a violation of this subdivision shall be transmitted to the State Treasury and, upon appropriation by the Legislature, distributed to the Department of Fair Employment and Housing for the purpose of enforcement of the California Fair Employment and Housing Act (Part 2.8 (commencing with Section 12900) of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), including, but not limited to, laws that proscribe sexual harassment in places of employment. However, in no event shall an amount over two thousand dollars ($2,000) be transmitted to the State Treasury until all fines, including any restitution fines that may have been imposed upon the defendant, have been paid in full.

(2) As used in this subdivision, “touches” means physical contact with another person, whether accomplished directly, through the clothing of the person committing the offense, or through the clothing of the victim.

(f) As used in subdivisions (a), (b), (c), and (d), “touches” means physical contact with the skin of another person whether accomplished directly or through the clothing of the person committing the offense.

(g) As used in this section, the following terms have the following meanings:

(1) “Intimate part” means the sexual organ, anus, groin, or buttocks of any person, and the breast of a female.

(2) “Sexual battery” does not include the crimes defined in Section 261 or 289.

(3) “Seriously disabled” means a person with severe physical or sensory disabilities.

(4) “Medically incapacitated” means a person who is incapacitated as a result of prescribed sedatives, anesthesia, or other medication.

(5) “Institutionalized” means a person who is located voluntarily or involuntarily in a hospital, medical treatment facility, nursing home, acute care facility, or mental hospital.

(6) “Minor” means a person under 18 years of age.

(h) This section shall not be construed to limit or prevent prosecution under any other law which also proscribes a course of conduct that also is proscribed by this section.

(i) In the case of a felony conviction for a violation of this section, the fact that the defendant was an employer and the victim was an employee of the defendant shall be a factor in aggravation in sentencing.

(j) A person who commits a violation of subdivision (a), (b), (c), or (d) against a minor when the person has a prior felony conviction for a violation of this section shall be guilty of a felony, punishable by imprisonment in the state prison for two, three, or four years and a fine not exceeding ten thousand dollars ($10,000).

Stalking 

California Penal Code 646.9: 

(a) Any person who willfully, maliciously, and repeatedly follows or willfully and maliciously harasses another person and who makes a credible threat with the intent to place that person in reasonable fear for his or her safety, or the safety of his or her immediate family is guilty of the crime of stalking, punishable by imprisonment in a county jail for not more than one year, or by a fine of not more than one thousand dollars ($1,000), or by both that fine and imprisonment, or by imprisonment in the state prison. Course of conduct is defined as a “pattern of conduct composed of a series of acts over a period of time, however short, evidencing a continuity of purpose.”

Definition of Sexual Harassment:

Sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when any of the following apply:

Quid Pro Quo:

(a) Submission to such conduct is either explicitly or implicitly made a term or condition of an individual’s employment, appointment, admission, or academic evaluation;

(b) Submission to such conduct is used as a basis for evaluation in personnel decisions or academic evaluations affecting an individual

Hostile Environment:

(c) Such conduct is severe and pervasive that it adversely limits or has the effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working environment

(d) Such conduct is severe and pervasive that it adversely limits or  has the effect of interfering with a student’s academic performance, or creating an intimidating, hostile, offensive, or otherwise adverse learning environment.

For more information please refer to the Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment Policy and Procedures.